These Modern Quilts are Definitely Ahead of the Curve

Peruse the latest issue of Curated Quilts and you’ll find yourself craving gorgeous curved quilt designs. They’re not quite as dangerous as some might imagine. Curves are surprisingly approachable, incredibly adaptable, and thoroughly modern. These modern quilts are based on traditional blocks happened to catch our eye and we have a feeling you’ll be captivated too.


Drunkard’s Path

This well-loved quilt block from centuries past has had a resurgence among modern quilters. With an endless array of variations, it always seems fresh and new. The gentle curve of a Drunkard’s Path block is an approachable way to begin your foray into curved piecing, if you’re still a bit hesitant. Once you get the hang of it, it’s sure to become a new favorite.

Big Island Sunset by Sheri Cifaldi-Morrill
Big Island Sunset by Sheri Cifaldi-Morrill

    Bold colors wake up the traditional Drunkard’s Path block and it is transformed into a lively tropical landscape with rolling waves and a darkening sky at twilight.

    Reel to Reel by Jenny Haynes
    Reel to Reel by Jenny Haynes

      This elongated Drunkard’s Path block flows smoothly against a bubblegum pink background, and was inspired by the Japanese concept of Notan, how the play between light and dark affects the overall design.


      Double Wedding Ring

      The classic Double Wedding Ring (DWR) has a reputation of being tricky, but updated cutting and piecing techniques will help you sew these curves with absolute confidence.

      You are Here by Victoria Findlay Wolfe
      You are Here by Victoria Findlay Wolfe

        Packed with powerful imagery, this DWR uses a neutral color palette with thoughtfully placed segments of bright red and yellow. It’s thoroughly engrossing, causing the viewer to reconsider this traditional design in its entirety.


        Pickle Dish

        A close cousin to the Double Wedding Ring, Pickle Dish quilts are whimsical and easy to adapt to a modern aesthetic. The playful striped curves are begging to be made with all your scraps!
        Felicitous Pickle by Kelly Spell

        Felicitous Pickle by Kelly Spell

          Without entirely meaning to, Kelly created a large-scale Pickle Dish quilt from neglected WIPs. An inherited bunch of Stack-n-Whack blocks, pieced into long, graceful curves, resulted in this wonderfully “Felicitous Pickle.”

          Deep See by Sherri Lynn Wood

          Deep See by Sherri Lynn Wood

            Without mentioning a specific connection to the traditional Pickle Dish quilt, “Deep See” follows those familiar striped curves, twisting and turning into a new creature. Embracing the rhythm of improv, Sherri channeled the bright colors and bold lines of an urban, graffitied neighborhood and brought it to life in this design.


            New York Beauty

            Modern Times by Jenny Haynes

            Modern Times by Jenny Haynes

              Combining traditional quilt patterns seems to be a theme here. This clever quilt design came about as Jenny played with the New York Beauty and Drunkard’s Path blocks. She described it as coming from a place of pure joy. It’s hard not to smile while gazing upon “Modern Times.”


              Curved Applique Piecing

              Counterpart by Riane Menardi Morrison

              Counterpart by Riane Menardi Morrison

                Astonishing in its depth, but beautiful in its simplicity, “Counterpart” was inspired by wedding rings and traditional wedding ring quilt pattern. The rings are made with bias strip appliqué, and hand quilted with sashimi thread.   

                Convergence by Latifah Saafir
                Convergence by Latifah Saafir

                  Inspired by her love of Scandinavian design, Latifah ventured boldly into the world of applique with bright red bias tape and the tiniest hint of refreshing aqua on a neutral background. It’s an inspiring example of using a traditional material in a brand new way.




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