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Solid Ground: Covid Gallery

Polygon Gallery Review

There are so many reasons to like polygons. One of the reasons we chose the geometric shape as a focus for the journal is because of its broad flexibility. It is ubiquitous in the quilting world,  lending itself to endless possibilities. We are excited to share a sampling of the innovative polygon quilts our contributors created. 


Three Lines by Lee Sproull www.leesproull.com

Three Linesby Lee Sproullwww.leesproull.com

Three Lines was started in a Nancy Crow workshop with the instructions to cut strips of fabric and arrange them on the design wall in an interesting pattern. The contrast in directional movement as well as color is arresting.  


Work in Progress by Nicole Kroesen @nkroesen

Work in Progress by Nicole Kroesen @nkroesen

Kroeson says about her quilt: “Work in Progress traces the journey of growth through subtle shifts of changing shapes, from what we were to what we may become. Sometimes, personal growth happens all at once in a spontaneous moment of radical change. But more often, growth and change take place over time--incrementally, subtly, and often without the full awareness of the individual. It is sometimes difficult to look ahead and see the goals that are looming in front of us, and to imagine what we might be like when we reach those goals. But when we allow change to happen steadily and gently over time, we can look back and see how far we have come.” We love this thoughtful piece.  

Flor by Augusto Garcia @capaquilts

Flor by Augusto Garcia @capaquilts

The inspiration forFlor was found in the Spanish word ‘flor’ which means ‘flower.’ Garcia was also inspired by Art-Deco wallpapers. The gradual shift in block size creates a dynamic piece and fills the quilt with movement.   

Correlation by Michelle Wilkie @ml_wilkie

Correlationby Michelle Wilkie @ml_wilkie

Correlation is the result of Wilkie exploring color for 100 days. Her initial goal was to make a 6” block with two colors at random angles and the negative space these angles would make would be white. The quilt got its name from the design reminding Wilkie of scatter plots. Scatter plots are created when you compare two variables. If two variables are correlated they form a linear pattern. The use of negative space in this quilt gives all the different blocks room to breathe, making the placement of each one relevant to the overall design. There is something interesting to look at at every turn. 

Indistinct Shadows by Colleen McFarlin @five_five_studio

Indistinct Shadows by Colleen McFarlin @five_five_studio

This quilt was inspired by the shadows dancing across McFarlin’s bedroom ceiling during thunderstorms at night. During the summers when she was younger she would lie awake waiting for each bolt of light to create a new landscape. The polygons in this quilt create a sense of intensity with their sharp points and the stark colors used.  

Parading Parallelograms by Claire Victor @cvquilts

Parading Parallelograms by Claire Victor @cvquilts

Victor’s focus is on creating quilts that have a 3D appearance. This quilt is part of a series exploring the illusion of depth using color, texture, and negative space without painting, shading, or shadows. Construction was done using English paper piecing. In addition to creating a 3D effect, the colors Victor chose add energy and fun to the quilt. 


You can find these Polygon quilts and more inCurated Quilts, Issue no. 17: Polygon. Purchase your copy today! 


By Brittany Bowen Burton

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